Shoulders
 
Stingers, also known as burners, are common injuries in contact sports, such as American football and rugby. These injuries can also be seen in wrestling, hockey, basketball, and boxing...[Read More]
An SC sprain is an injury to the joint where the clavicle (collarbone) meets the sternum (breastbone). These injuries are rare, requiring an accident with a lot of force, such as a tackle in football or rugby....[Read More]
A shoulder separation is an injury to the acromioclavicular (AC) joint, which is located at the end of the collar bone (clavicle) on top of the shoulder. ...[Read More]
The shoulder joint is the most commonly dislocated joint in the body....[Read More]
Rotator cuff tears refer to partial or full tears of one or a number of the 4 muscles that help move the shoulder and keep the end of the long bone of the arm within the shallow socket of the shoulder (the “rotator cuff”). ...[Read More]
“Little league shoulder” is a condition that arises from microscopic injuries to the growth plate in the shoulder that occurs in athletes that throw overhead....[Read More]
A labral tear is an injury to the fibrous cartilage portion of the shoulder joint that helps hold the long bone of the arm within the socket of the shoulder....[Read More]
The clavicle, or collarbone, is a long bone between the sternum (breastbone) and scapula (shoulder blade)....[Read More]
Calcific tendonitis or tendinopathy is a rather uncommon disease. It affects predominantly Caucasian populations, women between ages 30 to 50 years old, diabetics, and individuals with thyroid disease....[Read More]
 
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