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ICE HOCKEY
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For centuries, games similar to ice hockey have been played in Europe. However, it was in Montreal, Canada, where the first organized game was played in 1875, according to rules stipulated by Canadian James George Aylwin Creighton. Both male and female athletes now play ice hockey all over the world, at the youth, high school, collegiate, professional and Olympic levels. The level at which the sport is being played dictates specific rules, although the basic concepts remain the same.

Because of the high-velocity, high-impact nature of the sport, ice hockey players may suffer concussions. Shoulder injuries are common, including shoulder separation and collarbone fractures. Elbow injuries in ice hockey are relatively common, as the elbow is a frequent area of contact. Olecranon bursitis may occur due to direct trauma. A fall on the outstretched arm or contact with the boards may cause wrist injuries. Hockey players are at risk for lower back injuries as well. Pulled muscles of the back comprise the most common injury in hockey.

The skating stride makes hockey players very prone to injuries of the groin muscles and the hip joint. Trochanteric bursitis and hip pointers may result from direct blows to the hip area. Meniscal tears and anterior cruciate ligament tears may also occur in hockey players’ knees, but are less common in ice hockey compared to basketball, soccer and American football.
 

AMSSM Member Author: George G.A. Pujalte, MD 

Category: Hockey,

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